karnythia:

So let’s talk about this idea that racist depictions in the media is a thing of the past for black people again. Or not. People could just try looking shit up.

2,466 notes

dogshaming:

Tug-O’-Bra…

Meet Rupert and Alfie the Jack Russells… 1 year old Rupert and his 4 month old adopted brother Alfie decided to play ‘Tug-Of-War’ with their Mum’s bra whilst she was catching up on some well deserved rest…

dogshaming:

Tug-O’-Bra…

Meet Rupert and Alfie the Jack Russells… 1 year old Rupert and his 4 month old adopted brother Alfie decided to play ‘Tug-Of-War’ with their Mum’s bra whilst she was catching up on some well deserved rest…

309 notes

dynastylnoire:

theultraintrovert:

yung-blavk:

loveyourselfandcharizard:

dynastylnoire:

weloveblackgirls:

love-and-treason:

flo-got-swag:

"White dreads"

finally. She said it.

She basically made the video I was gonna make lol to a Tee. Look at this. And stop trying to tear others down to lift yourself up.

It scares me how many people have seen this

one black person saying it’s okay doesn’t make wearing those dirty mops on your head and calling them dreads any less racist or appropriation.

Here’s the thing. If you have to search the internet for one black person to make your thing okay when several thousand have told you it’s not you probably shouldn’t do that thing. That thing you are doing is probably racist.

I think the only reason why this topic gets me so much is because I went to a very liberal high school and one of our music teachers, who looked white, had dreads down to her ass. Turned out she was raised in South Africa. She has 4 kids age ranging from 6-25 and all of her children have dreads and all of her children are white. Her daughter is actually famous now, google her music: Naia Kete (Seriously look her up).

Yes, the cultural difference I am trying to get at are different from the random white people with dreads, but we don’t know their story and, in all reality, it’s not your hair so you shouldn’t care whether they have dreads or not. It’s their head, their body and their life. You feel offended because a white person has dreads? I mean, am I gonna have to be the one to sound like an asshole and say that white people usually straighten their hair and black girls do it, so they shouldn’t straighten their hair because white girls did it first and it’s their right?

If it visually bothers you, then gouge your eyes out and live blind because, in this world, you’re gonna see a lot of shit you don’t like or don’t agree with sooooooo pick and choose your battles like open-minded, good hearted, respecting individual. I love this girl and this video so much.

^^^^thank you. everyone take many seats and just stfu. who cares about there fucking head

So their story gives them a free pass at cultural appropriation? White south Africans are notoriously racist, and are known for appropriating the culture of native South Africans. “it’s their bodies…” blah blah blah, if that’s the case we should give them a free pass at further appropriating our culture and perpetuating anti blackness and racism?

Black girls straightening their hair cant be compared to white ppl with dreads, seeing how White people told Black folks to straighten their hair to be more “presentable”. Assimilation and Appropriation are TWO different things. White ppl aren’t the only ppl with straight hair, nor is there a cultural practice behind straight hair. Look up the history of Locs and how white ppl mocked Black folks for it until they wanted a “spiritual look”, they literally mocked Blacks folks until they wanted to appropriate it for themselves. 

Some of yall Negros wanna defend White peoples racism, anti blackness, appropriation of Black culture when they don’t even care for yall accept use yall to valid their problematic acts. 

She really tried to Kumbaya  all over what the hell I just said. NO BITCH. I don’t care how many white people you know with dreads or how you feel. There are various threads that discuss why it’s racist for whites to try to dread their hair. It is racist. It’s wrong. It’s grimy. Posting all the paragraphs in the world about your feelings doesn’t change the fact that black people with natural hair styled in locs are getting kicked out of school and their hair cut off. they are losing their jobs and being scalped.  And white people with dreads continue to make racist comments about how terrible black natural hair is

Come outside of your bubble and just google what happens to black people when they wear their hair naturally. 

613 notes

rejectedprincesses:

Nzinga Mbande, Mother of Angola (1583-1663)
Here’s another one of my favorite Rejected Princesses — Nzinga Mbande, 17th-century queen of what is now Angola. 
She began her political life as her nation of Ndongo was fighting off a Portuguese invasion. Her brother, a by-all-accounts wimp, seemingly could not bend over backwards far enough for the Portuguese, and once he ascended to the throne, the Portuguese just tossed him in jail and took over. Nzinga approached the Portuguese and demanded her brother’s return and that they leave Ndongo. At their meeting, in a sign of disrespect, the Portuguese offered her no chair to sit in, instead providing merely a floor mat fit for servants.
In response, Nzinga ordered one of her servants to get on all fours, sitting on her as she would a chair. After the negotiations concluded, according to some accounts (more on that later), she slit her throat in full view of everyone, and informed them that the Queen of Ndongo does not use the same chair twice. Shortly thereafter, the Portuguese agreed to let her brother go.
With her brother now safely back home, she is said (again, more on that later) to have murdered him in his sleep, killed her brother’s son, and assumed the throne herself - because if you’re going to do something right, you better do it yourself. From there, she moved south, started a new country, conquered the infamous ruthless cannibal tribe known as the Jaga, began offering sanctuary to runaway slaves and defector soldiers, and waged war on the Portuguese for THIRTY FIVE YEARS. 
Now, you may have noticed that I have repeatedly used words like “supposedly” and “according to some accounts.” As with many powerful historical women (as you’ll come to see as you read more of these entries), her story is a mixture of fact and fiction, with the two difficult to separate. That she met with the Portuguese and that she sat on her servant’s back is generally agreed by historians to be accurate. Furthermore, there is no doubt that she was a thorn in the side of the Portuguese, that she founded a new nation, or that she was a great leader.
Where it begins to fall to suspicion is in the more salacious rumors. While some report that she murdered her brother, others report that her brother committed suicide. Her slitting the servant girl’s neck and proclaiming her need for one-use chairs is likely hyperbole. Other outlandish rumors, to be taken with a brick of salt, include:
After killing her brother’s family, she ate their hearts to absorb their courage. 
As a pre-battle ritual, she decapitated slaves and drank their blood. 
She maintained a 60-man-strong harem throughout her life — this one, best I can tell, is more regarded as true than most of the others.
The men in her harem would fight each other to the death for the right to share her bed for the night. This one is more doubtful.
She also apparently dressed some of them like women.
Conversely, she staffed her army with a large number of women warriors.
It is difficult to determine how much of this is fact and how much fiction — it is entirely possible that she stirred up some of this as her own PR in the war against Portugal, and it is entirely possible some of it was a smear campaign by her enemies. Based off my (ongoing) research, a lot seems to stem from a book called Zingha, Reine d’Angola by Jean-Louis Castilhon. The book is in French, though, and I haven’t been able to find much English-language information on it yet.
Anyways, after decades of killing the Portuguese (both militarily and economically, cutting off their trade routes), they eventually threw their hands up and negotiated a peace treaty. She died several years afterwards, at the ripe old age of eighty-one. There are statues of her all over Angola to this day.
CITATIONS
Many people have (rightfully) been clamoring for citations on some of the more outlandish rumors here. I’ve wanted to hold off until I got to the actual origin of some of them, but I’ll release now what I have.
The at-the-time rumors about her seem to have largely stemmed from a Dutch captain named Fuller, who claimed he saw her dance wildly, stick a feather in her nose, decapitate a sacrificial victim, and drink “a great draught of his blood.” He nevertheless respected her greatly and described her as “generously valiant.” An excerpt from his notes can be found in Battle Cries and Lullabies: Women in War from Prehistory to the Present by Linda Grant de Pauw.
The rumors that she killed her brother, nephew, had a great harem, dressed them like women, and practiced cannibalism can be found in A Military History of Africa by Timothy J Stapleton (as well as many other books).
The rumors of her killing the slave whom she had used as a chair, proclaiming that she never used the same chair twice, that she killed her kin and ate them, and that she killed members of her harem can be found in Women Warriors by Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross.
I reached out to Robin Cross and Rosalind Miles for help in further research — as I don’t have physical access to Women Warriors, and I can’t check its bibliography online. Mr. Cross wrote me back suggesting I look up Portuguese Africa by Ronald Chilcote (1959).
I tracked down Portuguese Africa, and it has no reference to the slitting-throat legend (although the sitting-on-servant one is represented). I reached out to Mr. Cross again, but have yet to hear back.
In the meanwhile, I picked up another book by Cross and Miles, Hell Hath No Fury: True Profiles of Women at War from Antiquity to Iraq, which repeats the throat-slitting legend, but provides no bibliography other than Chilcote’s Portuguese Africa.
I’ve also found the throat-slitting legend repeated in Antonia Fraser’s The Warrior Queens, but with no specific source. At this point, worrying this is something I won’t be able to get to the bottom of.
I have also reached out to a scholar who is currently writing a book on Nzinga for help in uncovering additional sources of the rumors about her.
I will continue to update this entry as I am able to uncover more reliable information about her.
Art notes:
Her outfit and axe are derived directly from one of the statues around Angola.
The servant she used as a chair was female, not male. I realized this after the fact. Eep!
She’s wiping a bit of something red from her mouth as a reference to the blood-ingesting legends.

rejectedprincesses:

Nzinga Mbande, Mother of Angola (1583-1663)

Here’s another one of my favorite Rejected Princesses — Nzinga Mbande, 17th-century queen of what is now Angola. 

She began her political life as her nation of Ndongo was fighting off a Portuguese invasion. Her brother, a by-all-accounts wimp, seemingly could not bend over backwards far enough for the Portuguese, and once he ascended to the throne, the Portuguese just tossed him in jail and took over. Nzinga approached the Portuguese and demanded her brother’s return and that they leave Ndongo. At their meeting, in a sign of disrespect, the Portuguese offered her no chair to sit in, instead providing merely a floor mat fit for servants.

In response, Nzinga ordered one of her servants to get on all fours, sitting on her as she would a chair. After the negotiations concluded, according to some accounts (more on that later), she slit her throat in full view of everyone, and informed them that the Queen of Ndongo does not use the same chair twice. Shortly thereafter, the Portuguese agreed to let her brother go.

With her brother now safely back home, she is said (again, more on that later) to have murdered him in his sleep, killed her brother’s son, and assumed the throne herself - because if you’re going to do something right, you better do it yourself. From there, she moved south, started a new country, conquered the infamous ruthless cannibal tribe known as the Jaga, began offering sanctuary to runaway slaves and defector soldiers, and waged war on the Portuguese for THIRTY FIVE YEARS. 

Now, you may have noticed that I have repeatedly used words like “supposedly” and “according to some accounts.” As with many powerful historical women (as you’ll come to see as you read more of these entries), her story is a mixture of fact and fiction, with the two difficult to separate. That she met with the Portuguese and that she sat on her servant’s back is generally agreed by historians to be accurate. Furthermore, there is no doubt that she was a thorn in the side of the Portuguese, that she founded a new nation, or that she was a great leader.

Where it begins to fall to suspicion is in the more salacious rumors. While some report that she murdered her brother, others report that her brother committed suicide. Her slitting the servant girl’s neck and proclaiming her need for one-use chairs is likely hyperbole. Other outlandish rumors, to be taken with a brick of salt, include:

  • After killing her brother’s family, she ate their hearts to absorb their courage.
  • As a pre-battle ritual, she decapitated slaves and drank their blood.
  • She maintained a 60-man-strong harem throughout her life — this one, best I can tell, is more regarded as true than most of the others.
  • The men in her harem would fight each other to the death for the right to share her bed for the night. This one is more doubtful.
  • She also apparently dressed some of them like women.
  • Conversely, she staffed her army with a large number of women warriors.

It is difficult to determine how much of this is fact and how much fiction — it is entirely possible that she stirred up some of this as her own PR in the war against Portugal, and it is entirely possible some of it was a smear campaign by her enemies. Based off my (ongoing) research, a lot seems to stem from a book called Zingha, Reine d’Angola by Jean-Louis Castilhon. The book is in French, though, and I haven’t been able to find much English-language information on it yet.

Anyways, after decades of killing the Portuguese (both militarily and economically, cutting off their trade routes), they eventually threw their hands up and negotiated a peace treaty. She died several years afterwards, at the ripe old age of eighty-one. There are statues of her all over Angola to this day.

CITATIONS

Many people have (rightfully) been clamoring for citations on some of the more outlandish rumors here. I’ve wanted to hold off until I got to the actual origin of some of them, but I’ll release now what I have.

  • The at-the-time rumors about her seem to have largely stemmed from a Dutch captain named Fuller, who claimed he saw her dance wildly, stick a feather in her nose, decapitate a sacrificial victim, and drink “a great draught of his blood.” He nevertheless respected her greatly and described her as “generously valiant.” An excerpt from his notes can be found in Battle Cries and Lullabies: Women in War from Prehistory to the Present by Linda Grant de Pauw.
  • The rumors that she killed her brother, nephew, had a great harem, dressed them like women, and practiced cannibalism can be found in A Military History of Africa by Timothy J Stapleton (as well as many other books).
  • The rumors of her killing the slave whom she had used as a chair, proclaiming that she never used the same chair twice, that she killed her kin and ate them, and that she killed members of her harem can be found in Women Warriors by Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross.
  • I reached out to Robin Cross and Rosalind Miles for help in further research — as I don’t have physical access to Women Warriors, and I can’t check its bibliography online. Mr. Cross wrote me back suggesting I look up Portuguese Africa by Ronald Chilcote (1959).
  • I tracked down Portuguese Africa, and it has no reference to the slitting-throat legend (although the sitting-on-servant one is represented). I reached out to Mr. Cross again, but have yet to hear back.
  • In the meanwhile, I picked up another book by Cross and Miles, Hell Hath No Fury: True Profiles of Women at War from Antiquity to Iraq, which repeats the throat-slitting legend, but provides no bibliography other than Chilcote’s Portuguese Africa.
  • I’ve also found the throat-slitting legend repeated in Antonia Fraser’s The Warrior Queens, but with no specific source. At this point, worrying this is something I won’t be able to get to the bottom of.
  • I have also reached out to a scholar who is currently writing a book on Nzinga for help in uncovering additional sources of the rumors about her.
  • I will continue to update this entry as I am able to uncover more reliable information about her.

Art notes:

  • Her outfit and axe are derived directly from one of the statues around Angola.
  • The servant she used as a chair was female, not male. I realized this after the fact. Eep!
  • She’s wiping a bit of something red from her mouth as a reference to the blood-ingesting legends.

2,025 notes

merchantsonlong:

Lalesso Resort 2015

Shop Lalesso in store today.

718 notes

thecutestofthecute:

crowley-for-king:

flatsound:

i wanna feel how dogs feel when you let them go in a big field 

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415,803 notes

Iman and Joan Smalls photographed by Sebastian Faena, Harper’s Bazaar September 2014

(Source: howtobeafuckinglady)

313 notes

dynastylnoire:

clutchmag:

Five African American Women Will Be on Georgia’s Statewide Ballot For The First Time

072514-national-black-women-on-georgia-ballot

This November, Georgia will make history, or herstory. For the first time in Georgia and the U.S., five African-American women will be on a statewide ballot. These candidates include Doreen Carter for…

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

91 notes

jessicasignellknutsson:

Beautiful book from Phaidon about superfantastic Shiro Kuramata.

jessicasignellknutsson:

Beautiful book from Phaidon about superfantastic Shiro Kuramata.

244 notes

tashabilities:

witchsistah:

thisiseverydayracism:

il-tenore-regina:

indo-pak:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

They want us to FORGET what they did to our peoples and lands, they want to keep us ignorant of what crimes they committed against our ancestors.

this is why we can’t trust you white people

White supremacy is the epitome of cowardice. 

Do they really think we don’t know just because they burned the documents?

Brits = the filthiest scum on earth.

White supremacy is the epitome of cowardice. 

Say it again!

It’d be one thing if they did the shit, and could stand by it, 

But they destroy all the evidence! 

You see em do it on social media. Tweet and facebook comment racist shit, and then when people call them on it, they delete the comment or tweet, or hell, they whole account. 

White people, stop being cowards, please, shit.

Stand by your bullshit.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

3,159 notes

Joan Smalls by Viviane Sassen for Missoni Fall/Winter 2015 

(Source: howtobeafuckinglady)

291 notes

lordbape:

"it’s our job to teach the ignorant"

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6,693 notes

sabesque:

giantpandaphotos:

Er Qiao, He Mei, He Qi and Xing Mei at the Chengdu Panda Base in China on November 13, 2011.
© Jeroen Jacobs.

Just let me hold a panda, please

sabesque:

giantpandaphotos:

Er Qiao, He Mei, He Qi and Xing Mei at the Chengdu Panda Base in China on November 13, 2011.

© Jeroen Jacobs.

Just let me hold a panda, please

150,122 notes

Anonymous said: Yo, I don't think all Republicans/Libertarians are racist. They are just really selfish and only care about themselves. Okay, maybe they care about their rich FRIENDS, too, who happen to be all white- oh shit.

tashabilities:

yoisthisracist:

oh shit

Exactly.

Life is too short to be giving these hoes chances on the OFF chance that they’re actually actively anti-racist. 

Republican/Libertarian = autofuckingmatic racist, not up for discussion.

But white folks protest this, because their definition of ‘racist’ is a person who actively hates another person because of their race, 

So they hide behind “I don’t hate anybody” to get out of being called racist, 

All while supporting segregation and policies that keep resources from Black folks and not-Black POC.

113 notes